Medical Advances for Us


Health1I have struggled with some slow healing wounds on my leg. One wound clinic could not help as I struggled for several months. Sooo…I followed a suggestion I heard a time ago;  “It makes no sense to repeat the same action over and over again and expect different results.”

I moved to a different wound care clinic at Tri Star Southern Hills on Nolensville Pike, they uncovered a MERSA infection, they cleared that up with antibiotics. Wounds were healing slowly, but not fast enough for Dr Sudberry. He decided to use a fairly new treatment using a stem cell matrix developed with amniotic stem cells.

Amniotic stem cells are the mixture of stem cells that can be obtained from the amniotic fluid as well as the amniotic membrane. They can develop into various tissue types including skin, cartilage, cardiac tissue, nerves, muscle, and bone.

The stem cells fooled my body into thinking the wounds were that of a small infant. My doctor told me that if an adult breaks a bone the ends have to be touching each other securely for good healing. If an infant breaks a bone healing will occur if the two ends of the bone are in the same room!

The stem cell matrix is working, two wounds are healed and one is almost completely healed. All this in a matter of weeks.health2

The message? We must take responsibility for our health care.

A Great Way to Meet My Cloister Neighbors


Almost every morning I roll out of the garage in my electric scooter

Me getting my electric scooter serviced....

Me getting my electric scooter serviced….

and ride down Cana. Sienna, Mt Carmel, Miles Court, Emma Neuhoff, and Marquette. Most mornings I wish a “Good Morning” to the regulars in the neighborhood. I can almost feel a wind as the gang of four speedy women rush by on their morning walk. Dogwalkers with one, two, and sometimes three dogs. Most times I will go up St Lukes and get a cup of coffee at West Meade Place on the hill, I have heard it called “Heavens Waiting Room. But my favorite place is the walkway through the small field between Cana and the Jewish Community Center…..

Walkway on Open Field Behind Cana

Walkway on Open Field Behind Cana

This walkway visits three bird sanctuaries, courtesy of the nearby neighbors, and a rickety wood bridgeIMG_0553IMG_0554IMG_0555

Visit there neighbors, you’ll enjoy it.

Alphabet Soup…NP’s, RN’s, LPN’s, CNA’s


hospitalI have noticed that some health care providers reverse their name badges, we can’t know their names or their job responsibilities.. During a 9 month period I stayed at 3 hospitals and two nursing homes, I tried to be responsible about who were the providers of healthcare and assistance. I learned to ask, “Who are you and what do you do here?”. Most badges have an alphabet soup of letters. This what they mean and what we should expect they provide us. Perhaps this will be useful for those of us with elderly parents or a spouse who needs rehab therapy.

NP

Most* Nurse practitioners (NP), also called Advanced Practice Nurses (APN) have completed a registered nursing degree as a part of a bachelors degree, plus a masters degree. In addition, many now seek a doctorate level degree.

(*Not all NPs do have these degrees. In some states, NPs were licensed prior to these degree requirements, and were therefore “grandfathered,” meaning, they did not have to complete them.)

An NP may be certified in a specialty area, such as family health, oncology, or pediatrics. Nurse practitioners are clinicians, not unlike a physician who may have his or her own practice. He or she can serve as a patient’s regular healthcare provider, and may diagnose, order tests, develop treatment plans and write prescriptions.

Most NPs work in collaboration with a physician, which is usually required by the state they work in. They are accredited through several organizations, including the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. Be sure you don’t confuse nurse practitioners with nurses. Their work with patients may be very different.

The nursing home/rehab I stayed at used a NP several days a week with a MD visiting once a week.

RN

RNA registered nurse is a nurse who has graduated from a nursing program usually receiving an Associates degree and has passed a national licensing exam to obtain a nursing license An RN’s scope of practice is determined by local legislation governing nurses, and usually regulated by a professional body or council.

Registered nurses are employed in a wide variety of professional settings, often specializing in their field of practice. They may be responsible for supervising care delivered by other healthcare workers including enrolled nurses licensed practical nurses, unlicensed assistive personnel, nursing students, and less-experienced RNs.

Registered nurses must usually meet a minimum practice hours requirement and undertake continuing education in order to maintain their registration. Furthermore, there is often a requirement that an RN remain free from serious criminal convictions.

The RN’s at the nursing home/rehab I stayed at mostly gave out the meds and didn’t do much more then that except for the Wound Nurse who help residents with wound care.

LPN

You can often find LPN training programs at technical schools or community colleges, although some might be located at high schools or hospitals. Training generally involves a combination of traditional class work, such as biology and pharmacology, along with supervised clinical instruction. A person can generally become an LPN with two years of training; all U.S state and territorial boards also require passage of the exam.

Often, they provide basic bedside care. Many LPNs measure and record vital signs such as weight, height, temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rate. They also prepare and give injections, enemas, catheters, monitor wounds, and give alcohol rubs, massages. To help keep patients comfortable, they assist with bathing, dressing, and personal hygiene, moving in bed, standing, and walking. They might also feed patients who need help eating. Experienced LPNs may supervise nursing assistants and aides, and other LPNs.

As part of their work, LPNs collect samples for testing, perform routine laboratory tests, and record food and fluid intake and output. They clean and monitor medical equipment. Sometimes, they help physicians and registered nurses perform tests and procedures. Some LPNs help to deliver, care for, and feed infants.

LPNs also monitor their patients and report adverse reactions to medications or treatments. LPNs gather information from patients, including their health history and how they are currently feeling. They may use this information to complete insurance forms, pre-authorizations, and referrals, and they share information with registered nurses and doctors to help determine the best course of care for a patient. LPNs often teach family members how to care for a relative or teach patients about good health habits.

The LPN’s at the nursing home/rehab I stayed at also mostly gave out the meds and didn’t do much more then that.

CNA

CNAMost training programs for CNA’s (Certified Nurse Assistants) do not last more than one year and are offered at a wide variety of institutions, including career schools, community colleges, hospitals, nursing homes & even high schools. Program lengths vary but average one year. Prerequisites for entry are typically a high school diploma or equivalent. After passing the examination, the candidate is added to his or her state’s nurse aide registry and is eligible to be hired on as a Certified Nursing Assistant.

Certified Nursing Assistants work very closely with their patients. Many times the patient is either elderly or chronically ill; both cases need consistent, long-term care. The usual work environment is either a hospital or a home, either private or health-related. They provide basic medical care and work directly under the supervision of doctors and registered nurses. The tasks listed below make up the majority of what you can expect to be doing on a day-to-day basis.

Working for certified home health or hospice agencies to support and comfort terminally ill patients and their families. Enabling disabled, chronically ill or challenged patients to live in the comfort of their own homes instead of healthcare facilities. Providing light housekeeping, shopping and meal preparation for elderly, infirm and shut-in patients. Helping developmentally or intellectually disabled clients learn self-care skills and providing employment support.

Certified Nursing Assistant Job Duties:

  • Provides patients’ personal hygiene by giving bedpans, urinals, baths, backrubs, shampoos, and shaves; assisting with travel to the bathroom; helping with showers and baths.
  • Provides for activities of daily living by assisting with serving meals, feeding patients as necessary; ambulating, turning, and positioning patients; providing fresh water and nourishment between meals.
  • Provides adjunct care by administering enemas, douches, nonsterile dressings, surgical preps, ice packs, heat treatments, sitz and therapeutic baths; applying restraints.
  • Maintains patient stability by checking vital signs and weight; testing urine; recording intake and output information.
  • Provides patient comfort by utilizing resources and materials; transporting patients; answering patients’ call lights and requests; reporting observations of the patient to nursing supervisor.
  • Documents actions by completing forms, reports, logs, and records.

The CNA’s at the Christian Care Center Rehab/Nursing home were God’s Angels on Earth. They made living tolerable for the elderly, disabled, stroke, and diabetic/other amputees. The CNA’s and UAP’s at the VA Medical Centers in Nashville and Murfreesboro are “lazy clods”

UAP

Unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) is a class of paraprofessionals who assist individuals with physical disabilities, mental impairments, and other health care needs with their activities of daily living (ADLs) and provide bedside care — including basic nursing procedures — all under the supervision of a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse or other health care professional. They provide care for patients in hospitals, residents of nursing facilities, clients in private homes, and others in need of their services due to effects of old age or disability. UAPs, by definition, do not hold a license or other mandatory professional requirements for practice, though many hold various certifications.

UAP’s do many of CNA tasks.

The facilities and food at West Meade Place Nursing Home were superior to that of the Christian Care Center at 2501 River Road. But….the Physical and Occupational therapists who worked with the patients were not fully licensed but were what are called PTA’s (Physical Therapy Assistant) or OTA’s who finished a program at a Community College while licensed PT’s hold Doctorate degrees from schools like Belmont University.

Certified occupational therapists (OT) typically hold Masters or Doctoral degrees in occupational therapy from an ACOTE accredited institution.

To practice in the United States, occupational therapists must receive a master’s degree and pass a licensing examination to become certified by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). Occupation Therapy Assistants (OTA) usually hold an Associates degree from a community college.

Almost all inpatient therapy I received was by a PTA or OTA while the PT’s and OT’s held administrative / supervisor positions. I usually saw a licensed PT or OT during an initial evaluation, otherwise they were in an office cubicle or roaming the therapy area.

Here is how I rank the hospitals I stayed at.

  1. Centennial was the best
  2. St Thomas was OK
  3. Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC)-Nashville was a distant third but worst food than the Murfreesboro VAMC.
  4. Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC)-Murfreesboro was dangerous.  I was infected with MRSA and was treated for pneumonia with continuous antibiotic IV’s and respiratory therapy for 7 days  in their Acute Care ward. In military parlance, I had dodged a bullet. I was virtually ignored by the caregivers. PT and OT was substandard. I twice fell to the floor, supposedly being assisted by a staff member, the second time my prosthetic hip was shattered in three pieces while the titanium ball joint pressed my sciatic nerve flat for six days until I could receive surgery to replace the broken hip. I was then sent to a nursing home under a VA contract.

cccRiverRdHard work and great therapy at the nursing/rehab facility by a licensed Physical Therapist and a military trained Occupational Therapist restored my physical condition to the point where I returned home to my lovely and very patient wife.

Pew Research underscores the tech isolation of real seniors

Quote


There have been people at The Cloister who told me that “They don’t do computers.”

The majority of real seniors are not online.   The Pew technology survey is up to date – and it is a reflection that tech, training, and perception of benefit have a ways to go with real seniors – aged 75+. Fewer than half (47%) of the 75-79 age group and 37% of the 80+ are online.  And if they were, most do not have broadband access at home. And among the 65+, the song and dance about ease of use of smart phones and tablets is not resonating – 40% of seniors say that physical challenges make some activities difficult – and for those, even fewer go online. And for all the social pressure and media assumptions about online use, non-users do not believe they are at a real disadvantage.

The device divide is striking.  The needle has barely moved since the last Pew survey when it comes to tablets and smart phones. Smart phone device developers and retailers are not smart about selling them to seniors, even those with money and a college education.  Overall adoption among the 65+ for each is still only 18%, and even for those with $75,000 or more in income, only 42% have smart phones. Compare that to the general population with that income level – it is 76%. Ditto with tablets – the needle has not budged – 18% overall of the 65+ own a tablet – and of those with higher incomes, only 39% thought it was worth it.
Training matters – even for Facebook. Seniors worry about the difficulty of emulating what they see – and watching ads does not encourage them. See young people staring down at their phones, swiping to sign in, finding each other near restaurants, listening to smarmy machine-generated voices offering turn-by-turn directions. Arghh – 77% of the Pew senior responders — inclusive of those who already have smartphones and tablets, inclusive of the younger, that is 65-75, age group — believe they will need to assistance to become comfortable with their devices. And that includes (justifiable) worry about Facebook and minimal use of that non-sensical Twitter – even among Internet users – only 24% of those users feel comfortable about using these’‘social media’ tools without assistance.
What’s it mean that the needle hasn’t moved? The 2010 census reported that there are more people age 65+ than at any time in history – 40 million. Yet their technology usage of the latest and greatest is not growing year over year – why?  Seniors can certainly recognize themselves in advertising that targets them – see AARP publications for examples. But the cool devices and social media mavens do not show seniors, do not talk about them, or show any signs of interest in this population.  Is this ageist on the part of tech companies?  Certainly.  Are products still difficult to use in comparison to a mouse and computer? Apparently. Even with training offered by AARP and others, however, we need a better case for why using tablets, smart phones and social media really matters.  Useful to find information when away from the house, unbeatable for connecting in real time and staying current with families, tablets represent the most significant improvement in ease of use in the past 30 years.  Yet seniors aren’t buying into that theory – and according to this survey, they are not buying the devices. What’s your theory?

Recent Burglary Attempt at The Cloister


A Burglar has little chance at The Cloister

A Burglar has little chance at The Cloister

Nashville Police arrested a 35 year old man who attempted to burglarize one of our Cloister homes.

In this case a caregiver across the street from the victim’s home noticed the stranger entering the home, the police were called and arrived almost immediately. They discovered a man inside the home who claimed he was the grandson of the homeowner who had left the home on an errand. The burglar was arrested along with a pillowcase stuffed with various valuables belonging to the homeowner. The Cloister is such a close knit community that the burglar had virtually no chance of success. I get the impression that residents know everything happening at The Cloister. And when I listen to my wife’s conversations with our neighbors I am certain that all is noticed in the neighborhood.

But…..

There are some actions we can take to improve our safety and security. Here is a list of some things that can be done.

SIMPLE PREVENTION TIPS

  • Keep all doors and windows closed and securely fastened, including garage doors. An open window or door is an open invitation for burglars. Thieves are also quick to spot weak locks that may be easily forced open.
  • Doors should have deadbolt locks with a one-inch throw and reinforced strike plate with three-inch screws. All windows should have window locks.
  • Secure sliding glass doors. Place a metal rod or piece of plywood in the track and install vertical bolts. These will help prevent burglars from forcing the door open or lifting it off the track.
  • Always lock the door to an attached garage. Don’t rely on your automatic garage door opener for security. Update locks if necessary.
  • Burglar alarms – Not necessarily a deterrent for the “professional”, but more for peace of mind. Can reduce the amount of time thieves are in your home, and help to notify the police of a problem.
  • Keep shrubbery trimmed away from entrances and walkways. While large, ornate hedges may be beautiful, they also provide a hiding place for burglars who need only a minute to break in through a window or door.
  • Secure your valuables in a home safe or lock box.
  • Photograph your valuables and log their serial numbers.
  • Apply a personal identification number such as your driver’s license number on your valuables by engraving or with a permanent marker.
  • Lights with motion sensors are a great way to keep the perimeter of your home well lit.
  • When vacationing, create the illusion that you are home by using timers on lights, radios and TV’s.Making your residence appear occupied, even when no one is home, will deter criminals.

Vehicle Checklist

  • Always Lock it, Lock it, Lock it!!!
  • Roll up windows.Leave in a well-lit area.
  • Do not leave valuables in the car! Especially cell phones, GPS units, satellite radios, money, purses, and laptops

When you see something that looks suspicious call the police immediately.

We may not be prepared to act on all of these suggestions but even one or two might improve our security.

What is a Medical Neighborhood?


From February 2014 Takacs Newsletter

We Are All Living in a Medical Neighborhood (Part 1)

The Medical Neighborhood is an emerging concept meant to address all the care needs of an individual. The Medical Neighborhood – a group of providers in, literally, the geographic area of the patient and the patient’s family – will identify and coordinate all medical and non medical resources available to manage issues which impact a patient’s health. The aim is to improve clinical outcomes, provide a more satisfying experience of care for both patients and providers, and reduce care costs.
What does the Medical Neighborhood mean for older persons and how will it improve the experience of care they receive from their Medicare providers? Actually, it is part of a larger concept called The Patient-Centered Medical Home that the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is promoting as a future model for the delivery of care to people on Medicare.
In a Patient-Centered Medical Home, a Primary Care Provider (PCP) is responsible for providing “whole person care.” Under this model, the medical provider is challenged to engage an individual in managing more of his or her own care, to make shared decisions about care with that individual, and integrate with non-medical service providers to support the individual’s efforts. The individual is challenged with knowing how to manage optimum health between office visits and staying out of the hospital.
The Medical Neighborhood includes medical specialists, pharmacies, behavioral health, residential care facilities, non-medical home care providers, and other community resources. Working together, this group will educate and guide the individual in the direction of getting all their care needs met. To ensure that the individual receives optimal care, the Medical Neighborhood strives to meet psychosocial needs, address social and environmental factors that impact the individual’s health and well-being, and address financial and legal aspects that enhance or create barriers to care.
As an essential member of the Medical Neighborhood, the Elder-Centered Law Practice should have a presence early in an individual’s care plan. Within the Medical Neighborhood itself, an Elder-Centered Law Practice is regarded as a specialty: a team of nurses, social workers, licensed therapists, public benefits specialists and attorneys, under one roof, experienced in helping individuals find, get and pay for quality care.
Here is an example of a common situation many older adults and their families face. Frank, 87, is a frail man who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Living by himself at home, Frank is functionally dependent upon his overwhelmed son, Paul, to bring him his groceries, take him to the doctor, pay his bills, and get his medicine.
Is Frank living in a Medical Neighborhood? Where Frank lives – that is, whether or not he lives in a Medical Neighborhood – affects how successfully he and his son Paul will manage his care. That is the subject of our next issue of Elder Law FAX.

We All Live in a Medical Neighborhood (Part 2)

In last week’s Elder Law FAX, we introduced Frank, a frail, 87 year-old man who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Frank lives by himself at home and is functionally dependent upon his overwhelmed son, Paul, to bring him groceries, take him to the doctor, pay his bills, and get his medicine.

How would a traditional elder law practice view of Frank’s situation differ from an elder-centered law practice approach? And, how does the elder-centered practice approach meet the aims and goals of the Medical Neighborhood?

Under the traditional elder law view, Frank currently has or is expected to have a care financing and asset preservation problem. Typically, the elder law practitioner will be retained to put a plan in place to accelerate Frank’s financial eligibility for Medicaid benefits.

For example, the attorney (in another state) of a client of the Elder Law Practice explained in the written plan developed for the client that “the purpose of Elder Care Plans is to protect the assets of persons who have entered into or are about to enter into a skilled nursing facility … The primary way to protect assets is to seek eligibility for Medicaid.”

If Frank doesn’t need immediate nursing home care, Frank will get necessary legal documents in place and counsel on repositioning assets to make them unavailable or inaccessible to the State Medicaid program. If he is a veteran, the elder law practitioner will determine whether Frank is entitled to monthly payments from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (the “VA”) to pay for his care. A plan will be developed that may require Frank to restructure his assets to qualify for a VA benefit.

This may be done by making Frank’s assets legally unavailable to him. If those assets are not available to him, the State Medicaid program and the VA can’t consider them available. The asset repositioning may result in a five-year Medicaid lookback period. Usually, the elder law practitioner will counsel Frank and Paul on the advantages and disadvantages of such restructuring.

How will Frank’s needs for personal care be addressed? Or his values, or safety, or the risk that Paul will suffer caregiver burnout? The traditional elder law practitioner will make referrals to personal care agencies or geriatric care managers, but typically does not align the practitioner’s asset protection plan with the client’s personal care needs.

An elder-centered law practice aims for whole-person care, assisting Frank and his son Paul with attaining their goals of addressing issues that impact health or that enhance or create barriers to care. What level of care does Frank need and what kind of care does Frank want? A plan will be developed and implemented to help Frank find, get and pay for the care that most closely aligns with his values and his needs today. Frank will get legal documents and asset restructuring advice, but care financing—albeit critical—is only one aspect of the representation.

The elder-centered law practice will employ a team of health professionals who will coordinate care and advocate for Frank and for Paul. The practice will have a working relationship with community resources including residential and in-home care providers. The practice will offer Frank options. It is the aim of the elder-centered law practice to support older clients and their families in the day-to-day self-management of their chronic illnesses.

Elder Law Practice of Timothy L. Takacs
201 Walton Ferry Road
Hendersonville, Tennessee 37075
Voice: (615) 824-2571
Fax: (615) 824-8772

College Level Courses Free or Low Cost for Cloister Seniors


TSU & MTSU

Fee Discounts and Waivers

Senior Adult Discount
Rules & Procedures

Senior Adult Fee Discount/Waiver rules and forms are available at the university or college Admissions Office. Senior Adult students should register and submit these forms to the Bursar’s Office as outlined below.

T.C.A. 49-7-113. Disabled and Elderly Persons–Auditing or Enrollment.

(a)(1) Disabled persons suffering from a permanent total disability which totally incapacitates such person from working at an occupation which brings him an income, and persons who have retired from state service with thirty (30) or more years of service, regardless of age, or persons who will become sixty (60) years of age or older during the academic quarter or semester, whichever is applicable, in which such persons begin classes and, who are domiciled in Tennessee, may audit courses at any state-supported college or university without paying tuition charges, maintenance fees, student activity fees or registration fees; however, this privilege may be limited or denied by the college or university on an individual classroom basis according to space availability.
(a)(2) The provisions of this section shall not apply at medical schools, dental or pharmacy schools, and no institution of higher education shall be required to make physical alterations of its buildings or other facilities to comply with this section.
(a)(3) Prior to admittance, the university or college involved may require an affidavit or certificate from a physician or an agency charged with compensating the disabled person or adjudicating the permanent total disability of the person who is requesting admittance to classes, that such person is permanently totally disabled as set forth herein.
(a)(4)A student who is receiving services under federal or state vocational rehabilitation programs is not eligible for a waiver of tuition and fee benefits under this section. (b) Subject to the same terms and conditions as provided in subsection (a), disabled persons, as defined in subsection (a), and persons who will become sixty-five (65) years of age or older during the academic quarter or semester, whichever is applicable, in which such persons begin classes and, who are domiciled in Tennessee, may be enrolled in courses, for credit at state-supported colleges and universities without payment of tuition charges, maintenance fees, student activity fees or registration fees, except that the board of trustees of the University of Tennessee and the board of regents of the state university and community college system may provide for a service fee which may be charged by the institutions under their respective jurisdictions, the fee to be for the purpose of helping to defray the cost of keeping the records of such students and not to exceed seventy dollars ($70) a semester.

About OLLI at Vanderbilt…..

Who can participate?

Membership is open to anyone over the age of 50. We have no restrictions based on educational background.

How much do courses cost?

$80 for three courses in a specific term with $10 for each additional course.

How much do “special class offerings” cost?

Special classes vary depending on the number of sessions and number of students accepted in the class. Basically, we determine how much each session cost OLLI and charge accordingly.

How do I register for courses and special events?

We have created a tutorial with instructions to help navigate the registration process.

How do I retrieve my user name and password to register online once I create an account if I’ve forgotten that information?

Please view the attached instructions on retrieving your account username and password information.

Is there homework or exams?

For regular classes, there is no homework or exams. Occasionally, there will be recommended reading which is optional. The exception to this would be our writing seminar which does have assignments but no exams.

How much do Lunch and Learn sessions cost?

Our “Lunch and Learn” sessions provide a lecture on a specific topic and are free to all members. An optional lunch is provided prior to the lecture for a $10 fee. Reservations are required for both the lecture and the box lunch.

                   Who teaches OLLI at Vanderbilt courses?

Our courses are taught by a wide variety of qualified personnel. The majority are current or retired Vanderbilt professors, but there are also many who come from other educational institutions, government and business. Our curriculum committee reviews each proposed course and confirms that the instructor’s background is appropriate.

                                      Where do I park for the OLLI classes?

When classes are held at area churches, complimentary parking is provided at the church. When classes are held on campus, complimentary parking is provided at the Centennial Sportsplex as well as a shuttle to pick you up and take you to campus. The shuttles run the entire morning during class time in case you come late or need to leave early.

Do you hold class in inclement weather?

It is rare that we cancel class, but if a class (or event) is cancelled due to inclement weather, it will be posted on the OLLI at Vanderbilt website by 8:00a.m. the morning of the event.

About Lifelong Learning at Lipscomb…..

Session I – January 28 – March 7

Mondays—
Wilder and Wilder: A Film Sampler from Billy Wilder
February 3, 10, 17, 24 (Please note the longer class time and 4 weeks only) 3:00-5:15 p.m. Ezell Center, Room 136 Cost $60 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Hearn, Lipscomb University Professor, Department of English

As the “dark genius” of American comedy, Billy Wilder wrote and/or directed a remarkably diverse series of Oscar-winning films in Hollywood after emigrating to the U.S. to escape the rise of Nazism in his native Austria.  Join us as we sample and discuss some of his classics: Ball of Fire (with Barbara Stanwyck and Gary Cooper, 1941), The Lost Weekend (with Ray Milland and Jane Wyman, 1945), Stalag 17 (with William Holden, 1953), and The Apartment (with Jack Lemmon and Shirley McClaine, 1960).

Tuesdays—
Presidents You Wish You Knew More About
February 4, 11, 18, 25 and March 4 3:00-4:30 p.m. Ezell Center, Room 136 Cost $60 Instructors: Libby Lacock, Hank Davis, and Dr. Tim Johnson. Libby and Hank are both members of the Lipscomb University Lifelong Learning Advisory Board and Dr. Tim Johnson is a Lipscomb University Research Professor in the Department of History

Barack Obama is the 44th President of the United States but is only the 43rd man to serve. If you come to this class you might find out why. Each week we will deal with one or two Presidents that are less familiar to most people. It is interesting that most of these men were elected Vice President and succeeded a President who died in office. This term will deal with:

  • Both Johnsons – Andrew and Lyndon succeeded Lincoln and Kennedy. There were some similarities as well as great differences.
  • Ulysses S Grant – did you know that was not his real name? He was a close friend of Lincoln’s and was devastated by his assassination.
  • Millard Fillmore and Franklin Pierce – 13th President who succeeded Taylor and the 14th President who was elected in his own right.
  • Warren G. Harding – 29th President, elected in his own right but died in office and was succeeded by Coolidge.
  • John Tyler – 10th President and the first man to succeed a President.
Wednesdays—
Ancient China, Global China: Understanding China’s History, Government, Culture and Economy
February 5, 12, 19, 26, and March 5 3:00-4:30 p.m. Swang Center, Room 108 Cost $60 Facilitator: Turney Stevens, Dean, College of Business and Professor of Management

In this study of ancient China as a global economy we will study issues that deal with the country’s history, government, culture and economy. Each week will deal with the following:

  • Week 1: From Yao to Mao: 4000 Years of Chinese History in 90 Minutes
  • Week 2: Communist or Capitalist? China’s Inscrutable Government
  • Week 3: Which Mattered Most? Western Culture or Eastern Culture?
  • Week 4: Today’s Global Economy: China as Titan
  • Week 5: China’s Masses: Warmhearted or Warriors?

Suggested Reading for Individual Purchase:

  1. Henry Kissinger: On China (New York: Penguin Books, 2011) At Amazon, Paperback $14
  2. Jung Chang: Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China (New York: Touchstone Books, 2003) At Amazon, Paperback $12.78
  3. Nien Cheng: Life and Death in Shanghai (New York; Penguin Books, 1986) At Amazon, Paperback $13.11
  4. Simon Winchester: The Man Who Loved China: The Fantastic Story of the Eccentric Scientist Who Unlocked the Mysteries of the Middle Kingdom (New York: Harper Perrenial , 2008) At Amazon, Paperback $11.73
Thursdays—
Great Decisions: An Analysis of Eight Issues of Concern to U.S. Policymakers Today
February 6, 13, 20, 27 and March 6 3:00-4:30 p.m. Ezell Center, 3rd Floor, Andrews Institute Cost $60 or more depending on course length Facilitators: Linda Peek Schacht, Lipscomb University, Executive Director of the Nelson and Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Mary Pat Silveira, retired 30 year veteran of the United Nations

Great Decisions is America’s largest discussion program on world affairs. The name is shared by a national civic-education program, briefing book and television series administered and produced by the Foreign Policy Association.  The Great Decisions program highlights eight of the most thought-provoking foreign policy challenges facing Americans each year. Great Decisions provides background information, current data and policy options for each issue and serves as the focal text for discussion groups.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Defense Technology
  • Israel and the U.S.
  • Turkey’s challenges
  • Islamic awakening
  • Energy Independence
  • Food And Climate
  • China’s foreign policy
  • U.S. trade policy

You can order your Great Decisions 2014 Briefing Book at: www.fpa.org

Fridays—
“As the Page Turns” Book Club
February 7, 21, March 7, 28 and April 11, 25 (Note: Special Meeting Dates) 10:00-11:30 a.m. Meeting at the Avalon Home Cost $60 for both sessions Instructor: Kay Wyatt, Lipscomb University graduate, M.A.T. English from MTSU, and retired Lipscomb Academy English faculty.

Join our first ever Lifelong Learning Book Club as we read and discuss the following books of fiction and nonfiction, every other week for six meetings spanning both sessions (No class March 21st due to Spring Break):

  • (2/7) The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede
  • (2/21) The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
  • (3/7) Outliers: The Study of Success by Malcolm Gladwell
  • (3/28) Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson
  • (4/11) Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain
  • (4/25) The End of your Life Book Club by Will Schwalb