A Great Way to Meet My Cloister Neighbors


Almost every morning I roll out of the garage in my electric scooter

Me getting my electric scooter serviced....

Me getting my electric scooter serviced….

and ride down Cana. Sienna, Mt Carmel, Miles Court, Emma Neuhoff, and Marquette. Most mornings I wish a “Good Morning” to the regulars in the neighborhood. I can almost feel a wind as the gang of four speedy women rush by on their morning walk. Dogwalkers with one, two, and sometimes three dogs. Most times I will go up St Lukes and get a cup of coffee at West Meade Place on the hill, I have heard it called “Heavens Waiting Room. But my favorite place is the walkway through the small field between Cana and the Jewish Community Center…..

Walkway on Open Field Behind Cana

Walkway on Open Field Behind Cana

This walkway visits three bird sanctuaries, courtesy of the nearby neighbors, and a rickety wood bridgeIMG_0553IMG_0554IMG_0555

Visit there neighbors, you’ll enjoy it.

What Are My Roots?


Waves of Immigration-The American Melting Pot

European Americans are largely descended from colonial American stock supplemented by two sizable waves of immigration from Europe. Approximately 53 percent of European Americans today are of colonial ancestry, and 47 percent are descended from European, Canadian, or Mexican (or any Latin American) immigrants who have come to the U.S. since 1790 (and post-independence Mexico supplied Mexican-American immigration since 1890). Today, each of the three different branches of immigrants are most common in different parts of the country.

COLONIAL

Founding Fathers, the Committee of Five were Franklin, Adams, Jefferson, Sherman and Livingston of primarily English, Scottish, Irish and Welsh descent.

Colonial stock, which mostly consists of people of English, Scottish or Scots-Irish descent, may be found throughout the country but is especially dominant in the South. Some people of colonial stock, especially in the Mid-Atlantic states, are also of Dutch, German and Flemish descent. The vast majority of these are Protestants. The Pennsylvania Dutch (German American) population gave the state of Pennsylvania a high German cultural character. French descent, which can also be found throughout the country, is most concentrated in Louisiana, while Spanish descent is dominant in the Southwest and Florida. These are primarily Roman Catholic and were assimilated with the Louisiana Purchase and the aftermath of the Mexican-American War and Adams–Onís Treaty, respectively.

Waves of American Immigration

Waves of American Immigration

The first large wave of European migration

The first large wave of European migration after the Revolutionary War came from Northern and Central-Western Europe between about 1820 and 1890. Most of these immigrants were from Ireland, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, and Britain, and with large numbers of Irish and German Catholics immigrating, Roman Catholicism became an important minority religion. Polish Americans usually used to come as German or Austrian citizens, since Poland lost its independence in the period between 1772–1795. Descendants of the first wave are dominant in the Midwest and West, although German descent is extremely common in Pennsylvania, and Irish descent is also common in urban centers in the Northeast. The Irish and Germans held onto their ethnic identity throughout the 19th and early half of the 20th centuries, as well of other European ethnic groups. Most people of Polish origin live in the Northeast and the Midwest.

SECOND WAVE

The second wave of European Americans arrived from the mid-1890s to the 1920s, mainly from Southern, Central and Eastern Europe, as well as Ireland.[28] This wave included Irish, Italians, Greeks, Hungarians, Portuguese, Ukrainians, Russians, Poles and other Slavs. With large numbers of immigrants from Spain, Mexico, Spanish Caribbean, and South and Central America, White Hispanics have increased to 8% of the US population, and Texas, California, New York, and Florida are important centers for them.

Source: Wiki

What is a Medical Neighborhood?


From February 2014 Takacs Newsletter

We Are All Living in a Medical Neighborhood (Part 1)

The Medical Neighborhood is an emerging concept meant to address all the care needs of an individual. The Medical Neighborhood – a group of providers in, literally, the geographic area of the patient and the patient’s family – will identify and coordinate all medical and non medical resources available to manage issues which impact a patient’s health. The aim is to improve clinical outcomes, provide a more satisfying experience of care for both patients and providers, and reduce care costs.
What does the Medical Neighborhood mean for older persons and how will it improve the experience of care they receive from their Medicare providers? Actually, it is part of a larger concept called The Patient-Centered Medical Home that the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is promoting as a future model for the delivery of care to people on Medicare.
In a Patient-Centered Medical Home, a Primary Care Provider (PCP) is responsible for providing “whole person care.” Under this model, the medical provider is challenged to engage an individual in managing more of his or her own care, to make shared decisions about care with that individual, and integrate with non-medical service providers to support the individual’s efforts. The individual is challenged with knowing how to manage optimum health between office visits and staying out of the hospital.
The Medical Neighborhood includes medical specialists, pharmacies, behavioral health, residential care facilities, non-medical home care providers, and other community resources. Working together, this group will educate and guide the individual in the direction of getting all their care needs met. To ensure that the individual receives optimal care, the Medical Neighborhood strives to meet psychosocial needs, address social and environmental factors that impact the individual’s health and well-being, and address financial and legal aspects that enhance or create barriers to care.
As an essential member of the Medical Neighborhood, the Elder-Centered Law Practice should have a presence early in an individual’s care plan. Within the Medical Neighborhood itself, an Elder-Centered Law Practice is regarded as a specialty: a team of nurses, social workers, licensed therapists, public benefits specialists and attorneys, under one roof, experienced in helping individuals find, get and pay for quality care.
Here is an example of a common situation many older adults and their families face. Frank, 87, is a frail man who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Living by himself at home, Frank is functionally dependent upon his overwhelmed son, Paul, to bring him his groceries, take him to the doctor, pay his bills, and get his medicine.
Is Frank living in a Medical Neighborhood? Where Frank lives – that is, whether or not he lives in a Medical Neighborhood – affects how successfully he and his son Paul will manage his care. That is the subject of our next issue of Elder Law FAX.

We All Live in a Medical Neighborhood (Part 2)

In last week’s Elder Law FAX, we introduced Frank, a frail, 87 year-old man who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Frank lives by himself at home and is functionally dependent upon his overwhelmed son, Paul, to bring him groceries, take him to the doctor, pay his bills, and get his medicine.

How would a traditional elder law practice view of Frank’s situation differ from an elder-centered law practice approach? And, how does the elder-centered practice approach meet the aims and goals of the Medical Neighborhood?

Under the traditional elder law view, Frank currently has or is expected to have a care financing and asset preservation problem. Typically, the elder law practitioner will be retained to put a plan in place to accelerate Frank’s financial eligibility for Medicaid benefits.

For example, the attorney (in another state) of a client of the Elder Law Practice explained in the written plan developed for the client that “the purpose of Elder Care Plans is to protect the assets of persons who have entered into or are about to enter into a skilled nursing facility … The primary way to protect assets is to seek eligibility for Medicaid.”

If Frank doesn’t need immediate nursing home care, Frank will get necessary legal documents in place and counsel on repositioning assets to make them unavailable or inaccessible to the State Medicaid program. If he is a veteran, the elder law practitioner will determine whether Frank is entitled to monthly payments from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (the “VA”) to pay for his care. A plan will be developed that may require Frank to restructure his assets to qualify for a VA benefit.

This may be done by making Frank’s assets legally unavailable to him. If those assets are not available to him, the State Medicaid program and the VA can’t consider them available. The asset repositioning may result in a five-year Medicaid lookback period. Usually, the elder law practitioner will counsel Frank and Paul on the advantages and disadvantages of such restructuring.

How will Frank’s needs for personal care be addressed? Or his values, or safety, or the risk that Paul will suffer caregiver burnout? The traditional elder law practitioner will make referrals to personal care agencies or geriatric care managers, but typically does not align the practitioner’s asset protection plan with the client’s personal care needs.

An elder-centered law practice aims for whole-person care, assisting Frank and his son Paul with attaining their goals of addressing issues that impact health or that enhance or create barriers to care. What level of care does Frank need and what kind of care does Frank want? A plan will be developed and implemented to help Frank find, get and pay for the care that most closely aligns with his values and his needs today. Frank will get legal documents and asset restructuring advice, but care financing—albeit critical—is only one aspect of the representation.

The elder-centered law practice will employ a team of health professionals who will coordinate care and advocate for Frank and for Paul. The practice will have a working relationship with community resources including residential and in-home care providers. The practice will offer Frank options. It is the aim of the elder-centered law practice to support older clients and their families in the day-to-day self-management of their chronic illnesses.

Elder Law Practice of Timothy L. Takacs
201 Walton Ferry Road
Hendersonville, Tennessee 37075
Voice: (615) 824-2571
Fax: (615) 824-8772

Link


In 1997 Dave Ramsey wrote a book “Financial Peace”. He is very active, he publishes books, conducts seminars, broadcasted on radio, was even featured on some major TV news and talk shows. I read his book and was impressed by his simple plan that completely changed the way we ran our financial lives. Ramsey made a number of suggestions, among them were…

  • Live below your means (spend less than you earn)
  • Get completely out of debt
    • Pay minimum on all debt except the smallest loan or credit card
    • Dedicate everything you can to pay off the smallest
    • Then pay off the next smallest like rolling a snowball
  • Pay cash for every purchase
  • Never, ever “invest” with someone who earns commissions when they sell you an “investment”
  • Never, ever “invest” in something you don’t understand completely.

We follow these, and other suggestions in the Ramsey book even today, living debt free changed our lives. Since the late 1990’s he has published other books and various products related to money management. I still follow most of his suggestions with some exceptions:

  1. I don’t use debit cards I use a credit card and pay the balance to zero every month
  2. I make monthly payments on my new car because Toyota gave a zero interest car loan as part of their new car deal.
  3. I no longer trust the Banking and Wall Street thieves

College Level Courses Free or Low Cost for Cloister Seniors


TSU & MTSU

Fee Discounts and Waivers

Senior Adult Discount
Rules & Procedures

Senior Adult Fee Discount/Waiver rules and forms are available at the university or college Admissions Office. Senior Adult students should register and submit these forms to the Bursar’s Office as outlined below.

T.C.A. 49-7-113. Disabled and Elderly Persons–Auditing or Enrollment.

(a)(1) Disabled persons suffering from a permanent total disability which totally incapacitates such person from working at an occupation which brings him an income, and persons who have retired from state service with thirty (30) or more years of service, regardless of age, or persons who will become sixty (60) years of age or older during the academic quarter or semester, whichever is applicable, in which such persons begin classes and, who are domiciled in Tennessee, may audit courses at any state-supported college or university without paying tuition charges, maintenance fees, student activity fees or registration fees; however, this privilege may be limited or denied by the college or university on an individual classroom basis according to space availability.
(a)(2) The provisions of this section shall not apply at medical schools, dental or pharmacy schools, and no institution of higher education shall be required to make physical alterations of its buildings or other facilities to comply with this section.
(a)(3) Prior to admittance, the university or college involved may require an affidavit or certificate from a physician or an agency charged with compensating the disabled person or adjudicating the permanent total disability of the person who is requesting admittance to classes, that such person is permanently totally disabled as set forth herein.
(a)(4)A student who is receiving services under federal or state vocational rehabilitation programs is not eligible for a waiver of tuition and fee benefits under this section. (b) Subject to the same terms and conditions as provided in subsection (a), disabled persons, as defined in subsection (a), and persons who will become sixty-five (65) years of age or older during the academic quarter or semester, whichever is applicable, in which such persons begin classes and, who are domiciled in Tennessee, may be enrolled in courses, for credit at state-supported colleges and universities without payment of tuition charges, maintenance fees, student activity fees or registration fees, except that the board of trustees of the University of Tennessee and the board of regents of the state university and community college system may provide for a service fee which may be charged by the institutions under their respective jurisdictions, the fee to be for the purpose of helping to defray the cost of keeping the records of such students and not to exceed seventy dollars ($70) a semester.

About OLLI at Vanderbilt…..

Who can participate?

Membership is open to anyone over the age of 50. We have no restrictions based on educational background.

How much do courses cost?

$80 for three courses in a specific term with $10 for each additional course.

How much do “special class offerings” cost?

Special classes vary depending on the number of sessions and number of students accepted in the class. Basically, we determine how much each session cost OLLI and charge accordingly.

How do I register for courses and special events?

We have created a tutorial with instructions to help navigate the registration process.

How do I retrieve my user name and password to register online once I create an account if I’ve forgotten that information?

Please view the attached instructions on retrieving your account username and password information.

Is there homework or exams?

For regular classes, there is no homework or exams. Occasionally, there will be recommended reading which is optional. The exception to this would be our writing seminar which does have assignments but no exams.

How much do Lunch and Learn sessions cost?

Our “Lunch and Learn” sessions provide a lecture on a specific topic and are free to all members. An optional lunch is provided prior to the lecture for a $10 fee. Reservations are required for both the lecture and the box lunch.

                   Who teaches OLLI at Vanderbilt courses?

Our courses are taught by a wide variety of qualified personnel. The majority are current or retired Vanderbilt professors, but there are also many who come from other educational institutions, government and business. Our curriculum committee reviews each proposed course and confirms that the instructor’s background is appropriate.

                                      Where do I park for the OLLI classes?

When classes are held at area churches, complimentary parking is provided at the church. When classes are held on campus, complimentary parking is provided at the Centennial Sportsplex as well as a shuttle to pick you up and take you to campus. The shuttles run the entire morning during class time in case you come late or need to leave early.

Do you hold class in inclement weather?

It is rare that we cancel class, but if a class (or event) is cancelled due to inclement weather, it will be posted on the OLLI at Vanderbilt website by 8:00a.m. the morning of the event.

About Lifelong Learning at Lipscomb…..

Session I – January 28 – March 7

Mondays—
Wilder and Wilder: A Film Sampler from Billy Wilder
February 3, 10, 17, 24 (Please note the longer class time and 4 weeks only) 3:00-5:15 p.m. Ezell Center, Room 136 Cost $60 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Hearn, Lipscomb University Professor, Department of English

As the “dark genius” of American comedy, Billy Wilder wrote and/or directed a remarkably diverse series of Oscar-winning films in Hollywood after emigrating to the U.S. to escape the rise of Nazism in his native Austria.  Join us as we sample and discuss some of his classics: Ball of Fire (with Barbara Stanwyck and Gary Cooper, 1941), The Lost Weekend (with Ray Milland and Jane Wyman, 1945), Stalag 17 (with William Holden, 1953), and The Apartment (with Jack Lemmon and Shirley McClaine, 1960).

Tuesdays—
Presidents You Wish You Knew More About
February 4, 11, 18, 25 and March 4 3:00-4:30 p.m. Ezell Center, Room 136 Cost $60 Instructors: Libby Lacock, Hank Davis, and Dr. Tim Johnson. Libby and Hank are both members of the Lipscomb University Lifelong Learning Advisory Board and Dr. Tim Johnson is a Lipscomb University Research Professor in the Department of History

Barack Obama is the 44th President of the United States but is only the 43rd man to serve. If you come to this class you might find out why. Each week we will deal with one or two Presidents that are less familiar to most people. It is interesting that most of these men were elected Vice President and succeeded a President who died in office. This term will deal with:

  • Both Johnsons – Andrew and Lyndon succeeded Lincoln and Kennedy. There were some similarities as well as great differences.
  • Ulysses S Grant – did you know that was not his real name? He was a close friend of Lincoln’s and was devastated by his assassination.
  • Millard Fillmore and Franklin Pierce – 13th President who succeeded Taylor and the 14th President who was elected in his own right.
  • Warren G. Harding – 29th President, elected in his own right but died in office and was succeeded by Coolidge.
  • John Tyler – 10th President and the first man to succeed a President.
Wednesdays—
Ancient China, Global China: Understanding China’s History, Government, Culture and Economy
February 5, 12, 19, 26, and March 5 3:00-4:30 p.m. Swang Center, Room 108 Cost $60 Facilitator: Turney Stevens, Dean, College of Business and Professor of Management

In this study of ancient China as a global economy we will study issues that deal with the country’s history, government, culture and economy. Each week will deal with the following:

  • Week 1: From Yao to Mao: 4000 Years of Chinese History in 90 Minutes
  • Week 2: Communist or Capitalist? China’s Inscrutable Government
  • Week 3: Which Mattered Most? Western Culture or Eastern Culture?
  • Week 4: Today’s Global Economy: China as Titan
  • Week 5: China’s Masses: Warmhearted or Warriors?

Suggested Reading for Individual Purchase:

  1. Henry Kissinger: On China (New York: Penguin Books, 2011) At Amazon, Paperback $14
  2. Jung Chang: Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China (New York: Touchstone Books, 2003) At Amazon, Paperback $12.78
  3. Nien Cheng: Life and Death in Shanghai (New York; Penguin Books, 1986) At Amazon, Paperback $13.11
  4. Simon Winchester: The Man Who Loved China: The Fantastic Story of the Eccentric Scientist Who Unlocked the Mysteries of the Middle Kingdom (New York: Harper Perrenial , 2008) At Amazon, Paperback $11.73
Thursdays—
Great Decisions: An Analysis of Eight Issues of Concern to U.S. Policymakers Today
February 6, 13, 20, 27 and March 6 3:00-4:30 p.m. Ezell Center, 3rd Floor, Andrews Institute Cost $60 or more depending on course length Facilitators: Linda Peek Schacht, Lipscomb University, Executive Director of the Nelson and Sue Andrews Institute for Civic Leadership and Mary Pat Silveira, retired 30 year veteran of the United Nations

Great Decisions is America’s largest discussion program on world affairs. The name is shared by a national civic-education program, briefing book and television series administered and produced by the Foreign Policy Association.  The Great Decisions program highlights eight of the most thought-provoking foreign policy challenges facing Americans each year. Great Decisions provides background information, current data and policy options for each issue and serves as the focal text for discussion groups.

Topics to be discussed include:

  • Defense Technology
  • Israel and the U.S.
  • Turkey’s challenges
  • Islamic awakening
  • Energy Independence
  • Food And Climate
  • China’s foreign policy
  • U.S. trade policy

You can order your Great Decisions 2014 Briefing Book at: www.fpa.org

Fridays—
“As the Page Turns” Book Club
February 7, 21, March 7, 28 and April 11, 25 (Note: Special Meeting Dates) 10:00-11:30 a.m. Meeting at the Avalon Home Cost $60 for both sessions Instructor: Kay Wyatt, Lipscomb University graduate, M.A.T. English from MTSU, and retired Lipscomb Academy English faculty.

Join our first ever Lifelong Learning Book Club as we read and discuss the following books of fiction and nonfiction, every other week for six meetings spanning both sessions (No class March 21st due to Spring Break):

  • (2/7) The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede
  • (2/21) The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
  • (3/7) Outliers: The Study of Success by Malcolm Gladwell
  • (3/28) Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson
  • (4/11) Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain
  • (4/25) The End of your Life Book Club by Will Schwalb

For Those With Just About All They Need and Almost Everything That They Want


-christmas-wreath

Gift ideas for Downsized Seniors (Courtesy of Harpeth’s “The Meadows” Website)

  • A warm fuzzy throw.  You can’t have too many throws that keep you warm when you are watching television or reading a book.  And they make a nice lighter blanket for a single bed.  Throws can even be customized with photos or favorite sports teams.
  • Food.  What about a special fruit basket or fruit-of-the-month club?  Or maybe a special batch of their favorite cookie, fudge or cake that they no longer make. They might like a special candy.  Hard candies are nice for those taking medicine that creates a dry mouth. Local produce delivered to their home might be welcome as well.   It’s a thoughtful treat they might not think about for themselves.
  • Clothes.  Sometimes shopping trips become less frequent and a senior might need a new sweater or jacket.  Front opening blouses or shirts are easier for many to put on.  Jogging suits are also popular with both men and women.  They might appreciate sleepwear, robes, slippers or underwear.
  • Batteries.  It is always a good idea to have extra batteries on hand.  Many need batteries for hearing aids, watches and maybe a favorite electronic device.
  • Movies.  Classic movies like Sound of Music, My Fair Lady and A Wonderful Life would be fun to watch as a family and provide future entertainment for your family member.  Other popular movies include “The Bucket List”, “Lincoln” or movies they can watch with their grandchildren like “Up”, “The Princess Bride” or “The Polar Express”.
  • Kindle or Tablet. Think about loading a Kindle or iPad with books, movies, family photos and magazines they would like.  Then spend an afternoon showing them how to use it, send emails to their grandkids and even surf the internet.
  • Easy to use Mobile Phones.  Many smartphones of today offer large buttons, photo speed dial, visual rings and more. There are also landline phones that can be adjusted for volume.
  • Lift Chairs.  For those who have trouble with their knees or experience weakness, a recliner built with an easy-to-use lift might be just what the doctor ordered.
  • A Magnifier and Family Photo Album.  A family album already filled with pictures that bring back special memories of friends and families is always valued.  Why not add a lighted magnifier to assist in viewing those great photos?
  • Lap Desk.  A bean bag lap desk, some note cards and stamps would make a great gift.  A portable lap desk can be used for crafts, eating and reading.
  • Grocery store and restaurant gift certificates.  Being able to manage grocery expenses or splurge on a lunch or dinner with friends helps ensure good nutrition.
  • Coupons for Rides.  If your family member has stopped driving, provide a book of coupons for excursions they can share with family members.
  • Donations to a favorite cause or charity of your relative or friend.  A friend of mine asked her family to provide a piano for their church.  She can attend weekly and enjoy her “present”.
  • Walking shoes.  Athletic or comfort shoes that encourage walking or exercise can provide healthy benefits.  A handsome walking cane might be appreciated as well.  The folding canes are especially handy.
  • Manicure, massage or spa treatment.  A day of pampering might fit the bill.  Whether it is massage, a manicure/pedicure or a welcome haircut, these personal treats boost well-being.
  • Movie, concert or play tickets.  Retirees on a budget might not spend on these type of outings so tickets would be welcome.  And also, maybe your accompaniment.
  • Classes or lessons.  Maybe your family member always wanted to learn how to use a computer, play a card game or tackle a new craft.  A class at a senior center or community center might encourage social interaction and new skills.
  • Wreath for their front door.  While holiday decorating might not be as important, a fresh new wreath for their door is a welcoming touch for their home.
  • A Handyman Day.  Putting in new light bulbs, fixing a squeaky door or repairing an appliance might be more meaningful than any other gift.  Put a bow on your head.
  • Easy to use tools and pens.  For those with arthritis or grip problems, there are many padded grip tools like the OXO Good Grips kitchen tools and soft pens.

Christmas Gift Box